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The following product is recommended to treat this condition:

Emu Oil

Here are just a few of the responses we have received about these products:

An Emusing Treatment for Gum Disease
By Myra Charleston

One of my cats developed some sort of skin infection, the vet didn't seem to know what it was and prescribed an antiseptic cream to treat the infection.  The cream was doing absolutely nothing to fix his skin problem so I decided to put some emu oil on it and to also give him some orally.  The skin infection has totally cleared up now, but the only problem is my cat absolutely loves emu oil and asks me to give him some every day!  I've created an addict : ) 
Melissa D.


I HAVE BEEN USING EMUE OIL FOR PROBABLY 20 YEARS.  ITS SO GOOD FOR BURNS AND CAN PREVENT SCARING IF NOT ALLOWING BURNS TO SCAB.  EVERYONE SAYS FOR MY 67 YEARS MY SKIN IS NOT TOO MANY WRINKLES.  IRECOMMEND EMUE OIL TO EVERYONE FOR ANY SKIN PROBLEM.  SOME TAKE MY ADVISE AND SOME DONT..  THEY JUST DONT KNOW WHAT THEY ARE MISSING..  IN THE MALL THERE ARE ALL KINDS  OF SKIN CREAMS THEY LIKE TO PUT ON YOUR HANDS..  THERE COMMENTS ARE USUALLY  THAT I ALREADY HAVE SOFT HANDS ...WHAT DOESNT GO ON MY FACE GOES ON MY HANDS AND ARMS..  MY HUSBAND USES THE OIL FOR HIS ELBOW WHICH ARE REALLY DRY AND I USE IT FOR THE HEELS OF MY FEET....ONE THING THOUGH.  THE BOTTLE HAS MY CAT LICKING THE TOP  AND WAITING FOR MY NEXT USE..  HE IS JOHNNY ON THE SPOT FIRST THING IN THE MORNING AND LAST THING AT NIGHT FOR HIS  DAILY FIX.
SINCERELY PAT ARNOLD
PAT A. [pata1316@.com]


I use the Emu oil to remove pine pitch from skin and dog fur. I used to use rubbing alcohol which stings if the skin is scratched or broken and it is safer for the dog who will often lick the fur that was just treated. I also use the oil mixed with sugar as a special exfoliating treatment for dry weary hands and feet! I use the Blemish cream on insect bites and poison ivy as it draws out the impurities and causes quicker healing.
Thank you!
~Penee


Our golden retriever had a bad "hot spot" rash on her neck this spring -- the flesh was red and oozing, the fur was gone, and she acted sick. After a few applications of emu oil, she was visibly more comfortable and the rash healed right away.
Deena , Hillsboro, WI


Currently, we use the Emu oil on our feather-picker parrots, and they stop plucking, and start growing in beautiful, shiny feathers. Same for dogs and cats-flea bites and itching are stopped by applying to the affected area.
Peggy & Glenn G., Camas Valley, OR


Jo W.
PO Box 2129
Stoke, Nelson
New Zealand

This article provided purely for informational purposes. Please consult a medical professional for diagnosis and/or treatment.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
I have a 7 year old 16 hh Belgium Warmblood cross gelding (Jay) that on 16 January of this year staked himself on a metal waratah in the chest between his front legs. I found him standing in the paddock with a flap of skin hanging to just above his knees, with a gash of about 15 cm long and at least 20 cm deep (I watched the vet put his arm in there to clear any debris before stitching). The operation required a general anesthetic, two layers of stitches inside the wound, a plastic drain and another lot of stitches to put the skin back together.

Jay was confined to a small area for a month to stop him galloping around his paddock (which he managed to do anyway), and the last of the stitches came out on 17 February. I then started applying EMEA Salve directly on the whole wound. There was then a noticeable increase of healing, especially on the still draining part of the wound. On 4 March I started applying straight EMEA Emu Oil. What I noticed then was the scar at the ends of the wound became smaller, and the hair started growing back quicker. By the end of April, the wound wasn’t noticeable until standing at eye level to Jay’s chest. I kept applying the Emu oil until the end of May, and now the scar is only just visible.

I was initially dubious about apply the Salve and Oil straight onto the open wound, but after seeing the result, wished I had started applying it earlier.

I also have two thoroughbred geldings that recently have had an ‘itchy affliction’ under their stomachs causing them to itch themselves until raw, bleeding and swollen. I liberally smeared straight emu oil all under their stomachs. The next day the rawness had reduced and the swelling had gone down. I continued to apply liberal amounts once a day and rawness has completed healed. That was last week. I will continue to apply the oil until the hair starts growing back.

I have no hesitation in recommending the EMEA range of products for any wound or skin affliction, and always keep a bottle in my grooming kit, and in our bathroom cupboard.
Sincerely,
Jo W.


"Emu Oil vs Electric Barbed Wire Fence"
by: Myra Charleston

According to Jackie Mayner, it was just sickening, "You could see the bones and the joint in the shoulder."   Mayner was telling emu rancher Susan Swearengin about  injuries received by a mare owned by mutual friend and horse breeder Dalton Martin. Apparently several of Martin's horses had been chased by dogs into an electric barbed wire fence.  One in particular was severely injured. 

Martin raises registered Quarter Horses and Registered Paint Horses.  Lineage of his stud and brood mares goes back to Leo and Doc Bar as well as Wimpy and King, which are foundation Quarter Horses.   Grand Sires and Great Grandsires include Mr. Gunsmoke, Blue Bar, Poco Bueno, Question Mark and others. 

Needing access to pasture with water during the drought, Martin decided to utilize a pasture separated from that of his neighbors by a single strand electric Goucho Brand barbed wire fence.  There were cows on the other side of the fence.  Although the horses were familiar with this type of  fence, Martin knew it was not the best idea.   He planned on replacing it that weekend when he had more time and some help. 

The horses were turned into the pasture on Tuesday, September 8, 1998.  On Wednesday, September 9, 1998, he found the horses had run through the fence.  Two mares and a foal were injured.  One mare and the foal were still entangled in the fencing. Injuries to the white (gray) mare were the worst. Martin relates that the injury was "so deep you can put your whole hand inside it." 

Dr. MacLean, the Veterinarian who examined the injuries said there was little that could be done.  They applied a salve and gave the mare antibiotics.   Martin was advised by a neighboring farmer to put the animal down. 

Emu farmer Susan Swearengin suggested he try emu oil. At her encouragement,  Martin began applying the emu oil when the injuries were 4 days old. He was surprised at how the emu oil seemed to clean up the wounds.  The foal had neck injuries so deep that only a few membranes saved its jugular vein.  The neck had been stitched up, but within three days the foal managed to pull the stitches out. 

Martin began applying emu oil the next day.  The foal healed quickly, in less than 5 weeks with no scars.   As demonstrated in the pictures, the hair grew back in its natural color.  The other mares' injuries were not as bad as that of the white (gray) mare, and in brown areas of her chest. 

Emu Oil was applied to this horse as well and she healed quickly, with no scar and the natural colored hair grew back. Because of the severity of the injuries, the white (gray) mare took longer to heal.  Using an old squirt type oil can, Martin applied the emu oil twice a day at first.   The emu oil kept the wound moist and as evidenced by the slight bleeding, it drained properly so it could heal from the inside out.  The oil also kept the flies down. 

As cold weather set in he applied it once a day, occasionally skipping a day.  "It didn't seem to need as much care, and it's so cold" he said, (but) "it doesn't seem to be healing as fast."  The only medication used was antibiotics for the first several days.  Martin was given a salve but did not use it after starting the emu oil treatment. 

Dr. MacLean was impressed with how well the mare healed.  After seeing the initial injuries, he states he would not have been surprised if she had foundered from the stress of the injuries and just laid down and died.  At two weeks she acted as if she would fall on her face if she tried to walk. He also reports that there was a bit of a divot in the muscling, but it's healed really nice. Dr. MacLean wants to see her again in the late summer or fall to see how much of the muscles come back. At four months Susan went out herself to check on the mare.  "The scab is smaller than a quarter and some hair has yet to grow back," she relates, "pink healthy skin though, about 1 inch wide and 3 inches long on each leg. We're sure the hair will grow back, as it has on the rest of the injury."

Susan also tells us that in the 11 week picture the hair is rough below the injury where the wire made some deep cuts.   She scratched this area and states the reason it is rough is the hair grew through the scabs.  Because it's holding the dead tissue, it appears rough.  When the mare sheds this spring, her legs should be smooth without any scars

Susan Swearengin is a member of the Arkansas Emu Association and serves as secretary on the AREA Board of Directors.  She sells oil under her own label, as well as other emu products from other companies.  A 9x15 Horse Poster showing the pictures featured in this article is also available. 

For more information, Susan can be reached at: 

Swearengin Farms 
Huntsville, AR

Flea Allergy Dermatitis
Flea allergy dermatitis occurs in pets that are hypersensitive (allergic) to flea saliva. Most dogs and cats can tolerate a moderate number of bites each day, but not pets that are flea-allergic. The itching can take a while to subside even after the fleas are gone, so some pets benefit from additional anti-inflammatory medications. The itching that these pets experience when bitten is so severe that in most cases there is a hair loss and skin abrasion. Even one bite can be disastrous. If you own a cat that is hypersensitive to flea bites and live in an apartment building that is infested, it is a nightmare.

“One of our cats is HIGHLY allergic to fleas and no matter what we did we couldn't get rid of the fleas because the neighbor never bombed her apt or even attempted to get rid of the fleas.” Lisa Fisher went on to say that her neighbor was finally evicted, but not before her cat, Methos, was in bad shape. “If you can picture a bald cat that looked like it had the worst chicken pox case ever that's what he looked like.”

The situation was pretty desperate, the Fishers had given him shots, used flea dips, powder and everything their vet had suggested, almost to the point (according to the vet) of poisoning the cats. Methos was even jumping into the bath or shower with her humans in order to relieve the itching. Already a user of emu oil, Lisa contacted dShae Villoch of dShae’s Essentials and asked if the oil was safe for use on her cats After being assured that the cats could lick it off in safety and getting confirmation from her vet that it was a good idea, Lisa shaved the cats to doctor the lesions. Improvement was almost immediate. “The flea bites started to heal within days of applying the emu oil but he was also getting some new bites too. Once we rid the apartment of fleas totally he really started to heal quickly. I would say it took about 2 1/2 weeks for the bites to totally disappear. He was bit head to tail I don't think there was any spot on him that wasn't bit.” Lisa went on to say that Methos loved the daily rub downs. “He actually seemed to look forward to them. Since then I have even used it to help promote healing when I had my female cat Cleo spayed. Vet said she healed faster than he has ever seen.”

And what about the showers? Does Methos still join his humans in the bathroom? “Methos loves water. The only thing that he does that really drives me nuts is that he doesn't trust anyone to bath alone. He will sit by the tub and watch who ever is bathing to make sure they don't drown. He'll even do it to Cliff and me.”

Lisa and Cliff Fisher are the owners of Custom Eggs.  They and their son are owned by 2 cats.


Veterinarian Testimonial
I started applying the benefits of emu oil to veterinary medicine approximately one year ago. An emu breeder informed me of the human application, i.e., moisturizer, anti-inflammatory and transport carrier for medicine. Considering these human applications it seemed reasonable to apply those benefits to the animal population.

Originally I considered the human application for anti-inflammatory properties and transport media and felt there would be applications to management of horse wounds, especially lower leg wounds. Although anecdotal, when used in combination with other drugs. I found accelerated wound healing and decreased tendency toward production of proud flesh. Depending on the type of wound, I often combined emu oil with DMSO or dexamethasone, or gentamicin for use in the management of wounds.

On distal leg wounds where there is decreased muscle, therefore decreased circulation and increased tendency for production of proud flesh, I found that when emu oil was combined with dexamethasone and an antibiotic, usually gentocin, the animal was much less likely to develop proud flesh. Management of non-suturable wounds with twice daily application of emu oil and bandage changes markedly reduced this same phenomenon. Epithiliazation of these wounds treated with emu oil preparation was faster and less scarring was noted. Likewise dehiscence of sutured wounds was less in emu oil treated equine patients.

Although I have not yet used emu oil in lame or arthritic horses, I am interested in combining the oil with NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) to control stiffness and pain in those affected joints. Based on claims of anti-inflammatory actions and transport carrier claims it seems logical to apply these uses to this area of equine medicine.

I have combined preparations using emu oil in bovine medicine also. A frequent winter lesion seen in dairy cattle is frosted teat ends. The teat end freezes and skin around the teat sloughs. The emu oil has accelerated healing in these lesions and made it possible to continue milking in cow through the healing process. In this type of lesion emu oil is used alone for reasons of milk residues. This is an area where even bacteriostatic claims apply as well as those previously mentioned. Similarly, in bovine practice ringworm lesions in calves is seen commonly. When the oil was combined with fulvacin, an anti-fungal medication, these lesions resolved and at a faster rate than when using other conventional techniques., i.e. bleach, iodine preparations, etc.

Even in small animal practice I have found application for emu oil in wound management. One important area in which I have found application is cast sore lesions. When the cast area is worn by a small animal the cast often gets wet or causes pressure on bony prominent areas. Dermatitis or cast sores develop. When the cast is removed there are wounds which have to be managed. Emu oil combinations have accelerated the healing process markedly. These oil applications used in my mixed animal veterinary practice are anecdotal. However, I frequently photograph lesions to determine the progress of healing, especially in wounds which will require long term care. I have slides (photos) for many emu oil treated patients. I have been satisfied with the effects the oil provides and I will continue to use its preparations in my practice as well as to look for new applications of emu oil benefits.

Matthew S. Zimmer, DVM Angola, IN